How Do I Hold this %&$#! Microphone?!

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How Do I Hold this %&$#! Microphone?!

Last time we started our “Top Tips for Your Next Speaking Engagement”.  This is Part 2 of better microphone usage:

  • Microphones can be handheld or lavaliere—the kind that clip to your clothing.
  • When using a handheld mic, make sure it doesn’t block your face. You want your audience to see AND hear you.
  • Hold the handheld microphone six inches from your mouth so that it picks up your voice clearly, but not close enough that your lips make that “popping sound” or  result in feedback, which hurts your listeners’ ears.
  • Avoid bumping the mic, as it causes feedback.
  • Lavaliere mics can be wired or wireless. If you’re using a lapel or lavaliere microphone, make sure that you place it six inches from your chin.
  • Clip a lavaliere mic to the center of your shirt, blouse, or tie at about the level of the second shirt button.
  • If the lavaliere mic is wireless, you’ll need to wear a transmitter pack that needs to be attached to the back of your waist, preferably to a belt.
  • Make sure buttons, earrings, nametags and other jewelry don’t touch the microphone, whether a handheld or lavaliere. The sound of the mic touching anything is magnified and distracts your listeners from your message.

Here’s to you and your next great event!

About the Author:

Ellen Dunnigan founded Accent On Business in 2001 specializing in public speaking, communication skills, and executive presence for leaders in business. She has 25 years of experience with professional and nonprofessional speakers in healthcare, media, politics, engineering, sports, and other industries. Ellen’s coaching in speaking skills gives established and emerging leaders greater confidence and credibility. Her leadership programs in accountability, alignment, difficult conversations, and organizational communication have helped leaders expand their influence. Ellen is known for her practical “how to” style.
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